THE TRANSNATIONAL

The Transnational is a bilingual literary magazine. We publish authors from all around the world who offer a new approach to the political and social landscape of the 21st century. Worldwide. In English & German.


Submissions Opening - May 30th 2020

Starting May 30th we'll be open to new submissions for our next magazine. Closing date will be the 30th of September 2020. For more information please check out the Submit page.


Volume 7 Now Available!

The Transnational Volume 7 is available on BoD (German bookstore), Amazon, Thalia and eBay right now.

The Transnational Volume 7
Volume 7 Cover (front)

Many thanks to our contributing authors:

Farina Graßmann, Nik Papageorgiou, Franziska Bauer, Michael Johann Bauer, Craig Czury, Thomas Davison, Lara Dolphin, Clive Donovan, Klaus Esterluß, Jay Frankston, Giorgi Ghambashi, Gergana Ghanbarian-Baleva, Gloria D Gonzalves, Rebecca Ruth Gould, Markus Grundtner, Yuan Hungri, Bray McDonald, Susi Menzel, Ivan de Monbrison, Richard Murphy, Marcus Nickel, Lance Nizami, Clara B Jones, Christine Kayser, Robert Keeler, Rohini Kottu, Olaf Lahayne, James G Piatt, Marlene Roeder, Gerard Sarnat, Helena Seide, Stephan Weiner.

 

And also a lot of thanks to our great translators:
Celine Kastner, Conor O'Loughlin, Isabelle Gore, Joseph Prestwich, Lisanne Windeln, René Kanzler, Rudolf Weiler



Presenting Authors and Literary Works

We periodically present authors to you, who support the Transnational, and their literary works. Those texts are only on our website. Other works can be read in the upcoming issues of the Transnational.

Featured: Adopt an oldie by Rudolf Weiler

Do busy lives end sooner? Or does it just seem so? Childhood, youth and adulthood to some feel like fast trains. An active life leaves less time and energy for retrospection and planning the last phase of one’s adult life.
Becoming a retiree has its sweet charms, but also snags and deceptions are frequent. The „Retired Husband Syndrome“ is well-known and is frustrating for both partners. First I refused to even think of my „new freedom“, but I made plans and jokes aboutit. I continued working well after the regular retirement age, started a new business as an editor, just to find out that this does not work. I renovated the house we live in and worked frantically in the garden. All to no avail.
Looking after my two sweet grandchildren somehow never materialised, which was a great deception. Travelling is no option for several reasons, reading and writing of course are life’s best resort. Facebook and Twitter were definitely not an advisable alternative for a scant social life. So what? As my wife kept complaining about my RHS I was thinking about what to do.
Having mostly had contacts with younger people as a former teacher, I met two people in their late eighties. Both of them are completely fit and active. Deep friendships developed within a short time, common interests and shared humour makes life easier for all of us.
There is a woman living next door, soon 90, taking care of her house and garden, doing her own shopping and going out whenever she can to meet people in a women’s club and even attend general annual meetings of companies she has shares with. She would like to go on a cruise, but cannot find anybody who wants to go with her... Chatting with her and sharing coffee and a laugh improves both our lives.
The artist and author I met a couple of years ago is an incredible wizard and a creative genius; he should be world-famous, but struggles to be acknowledged in his nativetown and country. He has travelled and lived abroad intensely, has painted thousands of stunning pop-art-dada-symbolistic works and written the longest Swissprose work of nearly 2000 pages. Adopting him means I am editing some of his work and doing some paperwork for him.
Both keep going in their lives, not without pain, but without complaining. I adopted them as one might adopt a poor child in Africa — they are both not destitute, but far from rich. And more generally one might suggest we „adopt“ people we meet every day, strangers, refugees, humanity after all.


About the author:

Rudolf Weiler, PhD, wrote an enthusiastic thesis about Nabokov’s novels and some literary criticism and published threebooks of short texts. He did more than 40 years' teaching ofEnglish, French and German languages and literatures. He is now working as an author, blogger, proofreader and translator. He is an active member of the Green Party, and is fighting for climate neutral wood logging, farming, human rights and democracy.

For more literary works visit the Authors and Works page.